Bartali Secrets
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  Posted July 12th, 2011 by Zdenko  in Cycling | One comment

Cycling retro

Source: Italian Cycling Journal

More Gino Bartali Secrets Revealed
Gino Bartali’s participation in the resistance during World War II was only revealed after his death in May, 2000. On April 25, 2005, he was posthumously conferred the “Medaglia d’Oro al Merito Civile” by the President of the Italian Republic.

This plaque in the honor of Gino Bartali, unveiled on June 17, 2008, in the presence of his wife Adriana and his son Andrea, celebrates the heroic efforts of “il pio” during the war (read previous story here). The plaque is located at the railway station in Terontola.

GINO BARTALI

Now, another secret of Bartali’s efforts to save Jews during World War II has emerged. The following was reported in road.cc: “Now, however, the Italian Jewish newspaper Pagine Ebraiche, its findings reported in La Gazzetta dello Sport, has revealed that Bartali’s efforts – and the consequent risk to himself and his family – went much deeper (than carrying messages and documents hidden within the frame of his bike on behalf of an underground network that was pledged to supporting the country’s Jewish population).

The Goldenberg family had moved to Fiesole, in the hills overlooking Florence, in 1940 after being hounded out of their home by fascists in the Adriatic coastal town of Fiume, then part of Italy but now in Croatia, where it is named Rijeka.

According to 78-year-old Giorgio Goldenberg, daily life in Fiesole was as normal as circumstances would allow. Each day, he would travel from the apartment he shared with his parents and sister Tea to attend a Jewish elementary school in Florence. Then, one evening, the youngster found Bartali and his cousin Armandino Sizzi in the living room of the family apartment. “I don’t remember how he and my parents met,” he says 67 years on, “but one thing I know for certain is that they saved our lives.”

Once German forces had occupied the city in 1943, Bartali and Sizzi sprung into action to help save the Jewish family. Giorgio was placed in the care of nuns at the Santa Marta school in Settignano, while his parents and sister were hidden in Bartali’s cellar in his home in via del Bandino on the outskirts of the city. The young boy would join them the following spring after it was decided that Settignano was no longer secure, and the family would remain hidden in Bartali’s cellar until Florence was liberated in August 1944.

“The cellar was very small,” recalls Giorgio. “A door gave way onto a courtyard, but I couldn’t go out because that would run the risk of me being seen by the tenants of the nearby apartment buildings. The four of us slept on a double bed. My father never went out, while my mother often went out with two flasks to get water from some well.”

Giorgio well remembers the moment that he and his family were liberated by British troops. “Everyone was shouting that the British were arriving,” he says. “I went out and saw a British soldier with the word ‘Palestine’ and the Star of David embroidered on his shoulders, I went up to him and started to hum the Hatikwa,” the song that would later become the national anthem of Israel.

“He heard me and spoke to me in English. I understood that we were free, thanks to Gino and Armandino.

Bartali died ten years ago, but his son Andrea has expressed surprise and emotion at this latest revelation of his father’s wartime activities.

“It’s a lovely piece of news that demonstrates once again the great heart of my father and that I hope will help us soon plant that tree in Israel,” he commented, referring to the trees planted at the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial in Jerusalem that record the Righteous Among The Nations.

Cycling Monuments, Memorials, Plaques, etc., Part III
Jac Zwart, author of the Dutch language book “Wielermonumenten – Reisgids door de geschiedenis van de wielersport” (Cycling Monuments – Travel Guide through the History of the Sport of Cycling), makes his first appearance as a guest contributor with this wonderful story.

“For a couple of years I have been passionately searching for locations of cycling monuments, to take pictures of them and to find out for whatever reasons they exist. To know if there is a story they are trying to let us remember. Usually that can be great fun, but sometimes a little bit frustrating as well.

This summer my wife and I had our holidays in beautiful Tuscany, where I had put some cycling routes together. One of them included a small sidestep into Umbria, when cycling around the Lake Trasimeno. We must have seen the small road sign pointing to the little town of Terontola, because it was only at 6 kilometer distance. At that time I was fully unaware of the existence of a plaquette on a wall of the local railway station in honour of Gino Bartali. That plaquette was unveiled on June 17, 2008, in presence of his wife Adriana and his son Andrea, and it celebrates the heroic behaviour of “il pio” during World War II. Bartali himself has never mentioned what he has done, but only recently it became known that he transported falsified identification documents for Jewish people in the tubes of his frame during regular training rides from Ponte a Ema to Assisi. He usually stopped in Terontola for a rest and to deliver the documents to the resistance. When continuing his ride, the local people would start cheering and encouraging him, creating the opportunity for the people hiding to enter the train behind the backs of the applauding police. It is estimated that by doing this the lives of about 850 were saved in the years 1943/1944.

Bartali on the Tourmalet

So I didn’t take this picture of the monument myself, I found it somewhere on the internet. Whenever someone reading this blog has the ability to take a picture in higher resolution, feel free to contact me by e-mail (jaczwart@planet.nl). I am planning additional contributions to the Italian Cycling Journal, highlighting other cycling monuments in Italy, although the frequency will be irregular and depending on available time. And since a collection can hardly be complete, I appreciate any hint or tip that you are able to give me. “

ed. note: Bartali’s participation in the resistance was only revealed after his death in May, 2000. On April 25, 2005, he was posthumously conferred the “Medaglia d’Oro al Merito Civile” by the President of the Italian Republic.

Bartali on the Tourmalet

Most of these climbs appear to be on roads that are not paved.

Gino Bartali and Fausto Coppi. They were known to be great rivals. They were also great friends. Bartali went to visit Coppi, who was sick with malaria, shortly before Coppi died. Coppi said “See Gino, I am first again”.

Gino Bartali reaching back to shift gears while climbing

Bartali’s Bicycle

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Gotta Comment?
If you've got a comment or opinion you'd like to share, send me an email or fill the comment fields bellow, with only requirements your name and email address. I might just publish you in glorious pixilated black & white! Comments may be edited for grammar, spelling and length, or just to make them better.

Submit your own stories for the Zdenko’s Corner about rides, Gran Fondo’s, having a good time traveling and/or cycling, Croatian cycling history, etc. All stories are very welcome. There are more than 400 stories already in this blog. The search feature at the top right, works best for finding subjects in the blog. There is also translating button at the top of every story so you can translate each page to language of your choice.

Send your comments to: zdenko@zkahlina.ca

One comment to “Bartali Secrets”

  1. Comment by Tandra Carlson:

    I really appreciate this post. I’ve been looking all over for this! Thank goodness I found it on Bing. You have made my day! Thank you again…

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