1914 Tour de France
digg del.icio.us TOP
  Posted July 2nd, 2013 by Zdenko  in Cycling | 2 comments

Retrospective

Source: Bike Race Info portal

Backpedalling through the archives – 1914 Tour Quick Facts:
5,405 km ridden at an average speed of 27.03 km/hr. 145 starters divided in “groupes”, that is, riders on sponsored teams and “isoles” or independent racers. 54 classified finishers. Philippe Thys took the lead in the first stage and held it to the end. Team Peugeot took 4 of the top 5 places.

His only real threat came in the penultimate stage when he was penalized 30 minutes for an unauthorized wheel change, putting Henri Pélissier within 2 minutes of him. Even though Pélissier won the final stage, he couldn’t close the gap to Thys, who had won the second of his 3 Tours de France.

1914 winner1914 Tour de France winner – Philippe Thys took the lead in the first stage

The Story of the 1914 Tour de France (June 28 – July 26).
The Tour de France started as nothing more than a publicity stunt to sell some newspapers. At its heart, the Tour remains just that, a vehicle to sell tires, shoes, bikes, telephones and countless other items that the eager sponsors of the teams and the race want to promote.

To this day, it is a combination of the tawdry, the magnificent, the base, the noble, the crassly commercial and the spectacular. Others have noted that its roots are in the lowest and the highest motivations of human endeavor. That is why it is so fascinating.

This excerpt is from “The Story of the Tour de France”, Volume 1. For the 1914 Tour, the only notable change in Tour protocol was the addition of race numbers being affixed to the rider’s bikes.

1914-cartinaThe 1914 Tour route. Being an Italian postcard, the cities have their Italian names. Parigi is Paris. This rider with the flowers is Philippe Thys.

Peugeot’s team was as mighty as any in the history of the Tour. It was still under the management of Alphonse Baugé, generally considered the best in the business at the time. Peugeot brought back a squad whose names resonate through cycling history: Philippe Thys, Gustave Garrigou, Émile Georget, Oscar Egg, Eugène Christophe, Jean Alavoine, Firmin Lambot, Louis Heusghem, Marcel Baumler, Émile Engle and Henri Pélissier. I count 4 past and future Tour winners (Thys, Garrigou, Lambot, Pélissier) and 4 Tour podium occupants (Alavoine, Christophe, Heusghem, Georget). Has any team in history had that kind of horsepower?

Alcyon had Marcel Buysse who moved from Peugeot, Odile Defraye and Jean Rossius. Of the 8 men in their team, only Rossius made it to Paris.

Automoto’s team had several great names including one from the past, 1905 Tour winner Louis Trousselier. 2-time Tour winner Lucien Petit-Breton and Paul Duboc were also on the Automoto squad. The great Costante Girardengo, perhaps the first truly great Italian champion or “Campionissimo” decided to try his luck in the Tour, also riding for Automoto. Girardengo was just beginning his mastery of bicycle racing, having won the Italian Championship in 1913. He didn’t really start to dominate Italian racing until 1919, and by then he was almost unstoppable. For now, he was not the team leader and he was allowed the freedom to race for his own victories only if a great opportunity presented itself.

1914B-il-gruppo-attraverso-Early in the 2nd stage from Le Havre to Cherbourg the pack goes through the Norman town of Pont-Audemer

La Française tried again with Octave Lapize and Charles Crupelandt. Again, no La Française rider made it to Paris. La Française’s time had passed.

The 2 favorites were the 1913 winner Philippe Thys and his teammate, the talented but volatile Henri Pélissier. The 1914 Tour was again counter-clockwise, Pyrenees first, covering 5,405 kilometers over 15 stages.

At 3:00 AM, 147 riders took off from the St. Cloud suburb of Paris. The first stage, to Le Havre, was a monstrous 388 kilometers and took stage winner Philippe Thys 13 hours, 18 minutes to complete. Jean Rossius was second and given the same time. The next day Jean Rossius won the stage with Thys second. With both having the same time and points total, the lead in the General Classification was awarded as a tie to Thys and Rossius. It stayed that way until stage 6. At this point, Henri Pélissier, showing more than just a promise of what he could do, was sitting in third place in the General Classification at five and a half minutes behind the tied duo.

1914E-caduta-all'arrivoCrashes at the finish are nothing new.

Stage 6 was the big Pyreneen stage. As in 1912, it crossed the Aubisque, Tourmalet, Aspin and the Peyresourde. It blew the 1914 Tour wide open. Firmin Lambot won the stage with Thys 7 minutes, 40 seconds behind. Pélissier took over 38 minutes to reach the finish after Lambot’s win. Rossius’ hopes for a Tour victory, which started out so well, were finished. He lost over an hour that day.

The General Classification stood thus:
1. Philippe Thys
2. Henri Pélissier @ 34 minutes 27 seconds
3. Jean Alavoine @ 46 minutes 23 seconds

Girardengo crashed several times in stage 5, losing over an hour. In the mountains of stage 6 he crashed again and abandoned. He never again returned to ride the Tour. He was the first of a long line of great Italians who never really found that racing in the Tour de France suited them. Italy would have to wait until 1925 to have one of her sons win the Tour.

Girardengo

The next day, still in the Pyrenees with crossings of the Aspet and Puymorens, saw Thys, Alavoine and Pélissier finish together in the front group, so there was no change to the standings.

01914stage8I’m not positive, but I believe this is the finish of stage 8 in the velodrome in Marseille. The large field necessitated running elimination heats to determine the winner.

Across southern France Thys stayed glued to Pélissier, finishing at the same time with him each stage. Even in the Alps with the mighty Galibier, Thys and Pélissier finished with the same time. Thys had the advantage. He had the lead and was strong. Tactically, he was in the enviable position of being able to ride defensively and economically.

1914L-Thys-passa-in-vetta-aThys crests the Galibier. Henri Pélissier went over first.

It wasn’t until stage 12 with the Ballon d’Alsace that Pélissier was able to drop Thys. Even then, Pélissier was only able to gain 2 minutes, 37 seconds. Thys had a nice time pad and if everything went reasonably well, he could afford to give up small amounts of time this late in the race. That is, if everything went well.

1914L-Faber-solo-sul-colle-Scenes from the mountains: Francois Faber alone on the Valgelaye.

1914F-Alavoine-sul-col-de-BScenes from the mountains: Jean Alavoine climbs the Buret.

1914F-Pellissier-e-Egg-sul-Scenes from the mountains: Pelissier and Oscar Egg together on the Tortes.

Big, powerful François Faber won stages 13 and 14. Those would be the last bike races the mighty Faber would win. Thys almost came to grief chasing Faber in stage 14. Ruining a wheel, he decided to gamble on the time penalty for getting assistance by buying one from a shop. He figured that this was preferable to surely losing the Tour by messing with the broken wheel and risking the huge time loss he would face trying to repair it. Christophe’s lesson was burned into the psyche of the peloton. Thys was hit with a 30-minute penalty that left him with a very close 1 minute, 50 second lead over Pélissier. Thys held this slim lead all the rest of the way to Paris. Pélissier did win the final stage, but Thys wasn’t letting Henri get away from him. They finished with the same time that day.

Thys had now matched Petit-Breton’s 2 Tour wins.

Another context can be used to judge the magnitude of Thys’ 1914 accomplishment. All Tour winners from 1905 (Trousselier) to 1923 (Pélissier) started the 1914 Tour except René Pottier, who was dead. In addition, Lucien Buysse, the 1926 winner also started. That made 11 men at the line who were either past or future Tour winners. Thys emerged supreme.

Tour de France_1914 legendsLegends of the 1914 Tour de France

And what of Eugène Christophe who had come so close to winning in 1913 before he was brought down by his broken fork? On stage 6, the first Pyreneen stage, he lost 2 hours. The next day with the Port d’Aspet, he lost another half-hour. In stage 11, the Alpine stage, he lost 1 hour, 14 minutes. By the time he arrived in Paris, he was sitting in 11th place in the General Classification, 8 hours, 31 minutes, 58 seconds behind Thys.

The 1914 Tour was completed under the gathering clouds of war. The day the Tour started, June 28, was the same day Serbian secret agent Gavrilo Princip assassinated Austro-Hungary’s Archduke Ferdinand. This event started the tragic series of ultimatums between the great powers of Europe and catapulted the world into the first of the 20th Century’s monumental tragedies. The 1914 Tour ended on July 26. On August 3, Germany declared war on France and invaded Belgium. The Tour de France and almost every other normal activity in Europe came to a terrible halt.

Philippe Thys (Peugeot)Philipe Thys winner of the Tour de France in 1914 and 1920.

1914 Tour de France Complete Final General Classification:

  1. 1.      Philippe Thys (Peugeot-Wolber) 200hr 28min 48sec
  2. 2.      Henri Pélissier (Peugeot-Wolber) @ 1min 50sec
  3. 3.      Jean Alavoine (PeugeotWolber) @ 36min 53sec
  4. 4.      Jean Rossius (Alcyon-Soly) @ 1hr 57min 5sec
  5. 5.      Gustave Garrigou (Peugeot-Wolber) @ 3hr 0min 21sec
  6. 6.      Émile Georget (Peugeot-Wolber) @ 3hr 20min 59sec
  7. 7.      Alfons Spiessens (JB Louvet-Continental) @ 3hr 53min 55sec
  8. 8.      Firmin Lambot (Peugeot-Wolber) @ 5hr 8min 54sec
  9. 9.      François Faber (Peugeot-Wolber) @ 6hr 15min 53sec
  10. 10.  Louis Heusghem (Peugeot-Wolber) @ 7hr 49min 2sec
  11. 11.  Eugène Christophe (Peugeot-Wolber) @ 8hr 31min 58sec
  12. 12.  Ernest Paul (Delage-Continental) @ 9hr 52min 51sec
  13. 13.  Oscar Egg (Peugeot-Wolber) @ 10hr 0min 40sec
  14. 14.  Léon Scieur (Thomann-Joly) @ 10hr 2min 30sec
  15. 15.  Camille Botte (isole or independent) @ 10hr 14min 33sec
  16. 16.  Angelo Erba (Alleluia-Continental) @ 11hr 21min 22sec
  17. 17.  Donald Kirkham (Phebus-Dunlop) @ 11hr 55min 39sec
  18. 18.  Hector Tiberghien (Delage-Continental) @ 12hr 23min 21sec
  19. 19.  Jacques Coomans (Thomann-Joly) @ 12hr 24min 15sec
  20. 20.  Ivor “Snowy” Munro (Phebus-Dunlop) @ 12hr 34min 57sec
  21. 21.  Charles Charron (Delage-Continental) @ 12hr 59min 23sec
  22. 22.  Henri Devroye (Armor-Soly) @ 13hr 22min 14sec
  23. 23.  Maurice Brocco (Gladiator-Dunlop) @ 14hr 32min 36sec
  24. 24.  Julien Tuytten (isole or independent) @ 14hr 36min 14sec
  25. 25.  Vincenzo Borgarello (Clement-Dunlop) @ 15hr 18min 21sec
  26. 26.  Louis Petitjean (Delage-Continental) @ 15hr 38min 44sec
  27. 27.  Jules Nempon (JB Louvet-Continental) @ 16hr 32min 55sec
  28. 28.  René Vendenberghe (JB Louvet-Continental) @ 17hr 5min 7sec
  29. 29.  Marcel Baumler (Peugeot-Wolber) @ 17hr 7min 55sec
  30. 30.  Marcel Godivier (Gladiator-Dunlop) @ 18hr 18min 57sec
  31. 31.  Paul Duboc (Automoto) @ 18hr 35min 32sec
  32. 32.  Pierre Everaerts (isole or independent) @ 19hr 21min 4sec
  33. 33.  Ottavio Pratesi (isole or independent) @ 20hr 31min 40sec
  34. 34.  Constant Ménager (Gladiator-Dunlop) @ 20hr 58min 45sec
  35. 35.  Charles Cruchon (Gladiator-Dunlop) @ 21hr 4min 56sec
  36. 36.  Jules Deloffre (isole or independent) @ 22hr 3min 15sec
  37. 37.  Camillo Bertarelli (Alleluia-Continental) @ 23hr 8min 26sec
  38. 38.  Louis Trousselier (Automoto) @ 23hr 44min 30sec
  39. 39.  Adrien Alpini (isole or independent) @ 26hr 11min 22sec
  40. 40.  Gaston Degy (Automoto) @ 29hr 5min 54sec
  41. 41.  Raymond Harquet (Alleluia-Continental) @ 30hr 4min 5sec
  42. 42.  Louis Engel (Delage-Continental) @ 30hr 54min 28sec
  43. 43.  Emile Guyon (isole or independent) @ 30hr 55min 10sec
  44. 44.  Mario Spinelli (isole or independent) @ 35hr 13min 35sec
  45. 45.  Charles Kippert (Gladiator-Dunlop) @ 35hr 56min 3sec
  46. 46.  Charles Dumont (isole or independent) @ 37hr 42min 31sec
  47. 47.  René Cottrel (isole or independent) @ 37hr 42min 31sec
  48. 48.  Sante Goi (isole or independent) @ 52hr 15min 32sec
  49. 49.  Emilio Cuchetti (isole or independent) @ 59hr 20min 16sec
  50. 50.  Gaston Neboux (isole or independent) @ 59hr 59min 1sec
  51. 51.  Henri Allard (isole or independent) @ 67hr 46min 24sec
  52. 52.  Henri Alavoine (isole or independent) @ 72hr 55min 21sec
  53. 53.  Marcel Rottie (isole or independent) @ 84hr 3min 10sec
  54. 54.  Henri Leclerc (isole or independent) @ 94hr 4min 45sec

GarricouGustave Garrigou (Peugeot-Wolber) finished fifth

1914 Tour stage results with running GC:

Stage 1: Sunday, June 28, Paris – Le Havre, 388 km

  1. 1.             Philippe Thys: 13hr 18min 28sec
  2. 2.             Jean Rossius s.t.
  3. 3.             Gustave Garrigou s.t.
  4. 4.             Costante Girardengo s.t.
  5. 5.             Louis Mottiat s.t.
  6. 6.             Paul Deman s.t.
  7. 7.             Henri Pélissier s.t.
  8. 8.             Emile Georget s.t.
  9. 9.             Octave Lapize s.t.
  10. 10.         Dieudonné Gauthy s.t.

Stage 2: Tuesday, June 30, Le Havre – Cherbourg, 364 km

  1. 1.             Jean Rossius: 12hr 15min 26sec
  2. 2.             Philippe Thys s.t.
  3. 3.             Emile Engel @ 1min 38sec
  4. 4.             Odile Defraye @ 5min 45sec
  5. 5.             Henri Pélissier @ 7min 16sec
  6. 6.             Emile Georget s.t.
  7. 7.             Oscar Egg s.t.
  8. 8.             Jean Alavoine @ 9min 13sec
  9. 9.             Gustave Garrigou s.t.
  10. 10.         Vincenzo Borgarello @ 10min 37sec

GC after Stage 2:

  1. 1.             Jean Rossius: 25hr 33min 54sec
  2. 2.             Philippe Thys: tied for first at same time
  3. 3.             Henri Pélissier @ 7min 16sec

Stage 3: Thursday, July 2, Cherbourg – Brest, 405 km

Places 5 – 13 given same time and place

  1. 1.             Emile Engel: 14hr 58min 6sec
  2. 2.             Louis Mottiat s.t.
  3. 3.             Marcel Buysse s.t.
  4. 4.             Odile Defraye s.t.
  5. 5.             Lucien Petit-Breton, Henri Pélissier, Maurice Brocco, Octave Lapize, Philippe Thys, Julien Tuytten, etc, s.t.

GC after Stage 3:

  1. 1.             Jean Rossius: 40hr 32min 0sec
  2. 2.             Philippe Thys: tied for first at same time
  3. 3.             Henri Pélissier @ 7min 16sec

Stage 4: Saturday, July 4, Brest – La Rochelle, 470 km

Places 4 – 13 given same time and place

  1. 1.             Oscar Egg: 16hr 13min 45sec
  2. 2.             Henri Pélissier s.t.
  3. 3.             Emile Engel @ 1min 46sec
  4. 4.             Jean Alavoine @ 1min 49sec, plus Emile Georget, François Faber, Jean Rossius, Alfons Spiessens, Gustave Garrigou, Charles Charron, etc, s.t.

GC after Stage 4:

  1. 1.             Jean Rossius: 56hr 47min 31sec
  2. 2.             Philippe Thys: tied for first place @ same time
  3. 3.             Henri Pélissier @ 5min 27sec

Stage 5: Monday, July 6, La Rochelle – Bayonne, 379 km

  1. 1.             Oscar Egg: 13hr 25min 29sec
  2. 2.             Odile Defraye s.t.
  3. 3.             Philippe Thys s.t.
  4. 4.             Louis Mottiat s.t.
  5. 5.             Henri Pélissier s.t.
  6. 6.             Jean Rossius s.t.
  7. 7.             Octave Lapize s.t.
  8. 8.             Pietro Fasoli s.t.
  9. 9.             Jean Alavoine s.t.
  10. 10.         Lucien Petit-Breton s.t.

GC after Stage 5:

  1. 1.             Jean Rossius: 70hr 13min 0sec
  2. 2.             Philippe Thys, tied for first place @ same time
  3. 3.             Henri Pélissier @ 5min 27sec

Stage 6: Wednesday, July 8, Bayonne – Luchon, 326 km

Major ascents: Aubisque, Tourmalet, Aspin, Peyresourde

  1. 1.             Firmin Lambot: 14hr 39min 4sec
  2. 2.             Philippe Thys @ 7min 40sec
  3. 3.             Jean Alavoine @ 26min 7sec
  4. 4.             Henri Pélissier @ 38min 39sec
  5. 5.             Angelo Erba @ 42min 13sec
  6. 6.             Emile Georget @ 43min 58sec
  7. 7.             Marcel Buysse @ 47min 22sec
  8. 8.             Odile Defraye @ 54min 13sec
  9. 9.             Louis Heusghem @ 57min 11sec
  10. 10.         Ottavio Pratesi @ 58min 34sec

GC after Stage 6:

  1. 1.             Philippe Thys: 84hr 59min 44sec
  2. 2.             Henri Pélissier @ 34min 27sec
  3. 3.             Jean Alavoine @ 46min 23sec

Stage 7: Friday, July 10, Luchon – Perpignan, 323 km

Major ascents: Portet d’Aspet, Puymorens

  1. 1.             Jean Alavoine: 11hr 47min 5sec
  2. 2.             Marcel Buysse s.t.
  3. 3.             Philippe Thys s.t.
  4. 4.             Henri Pélissier s.t.
  5. 5.             Jean Rossius s.t.
  6. 6.             Odile Degraye @ 5min 5sec
  7. 7.             Alfons Spiessens s.t.
  8. 8.             Oscar Egg @ 15min 17sec
  9. 9.             Gustave Garrigou s.t.
  10. 10.         Henri Devroye @ 24min 53sec

GC after Stage 7:

  1. 1.             Philippe Thys: 96hr 46min 49sec
  2. 2.             Henri Pélissier @ 34min 27sec
  3. 3.             Jean Alavoine @ 46min 23sec

Stage 8: Sunday, July 12, Perpignan – Marseille, 370 km

Emile Engel was disqualified and ejected from the race. Don’t know why.

  1. 1.             Octave Lapize: 13hr 0min 0sec
  2. 2.             Maurice Brocco s.t.
  3. 3.             Oscar Egg s.t.
  4. 4.             Emile Engel
  5. 5.             Louis Trousselier s.t.
  6. 6.             Marcel Buysse s.t.
  7. 7.             Emile Georget s.t.
  8. 8.             Jean Rossius s.t.
  9. 9.             Jules Nempon s.t.
  10. 10.         Pietro Fasoli s.t.

GC after Stage 8:

  1. 1.             Philippe Thys: 109hr 46min 49sec
  2. 2.             Henri Pélissier @ 34min 27sec
  3. 3.             Jean Alavoine @ 46min 23sec

220px-Jean_RossiusJean Rossius winner of stage 9. 1914 Tour de France

Stage 9: Tuesday, July 14, Marseille – Nice, 338 km

Major ascents: Braus, Castillon

  1. 1.             Jean Rossius: 12hr 35min 38sec
  2. 2.             Henri Pélissier @ 7min 4sec
  3. 3.             Philippe Thys s.t.
  4. 4.             Jean Alavoine @ 8min 12sec
  5. 5.             Marcel Godiver @ 13min 30sec
  6. 6.             Emile Georget @ 20min 13sec
  7. 7.             Jules Nempon @ 22min 10sec
  8. 8.             Camille Botte @ 30min 1sec
  9. 9.             Jacques Coomans @ 31min 7sec
  10. 10.         Angelo Erba @ 34min 27sec

GC after Stage 9:

  1. 1.             Philippe Thys: 122hr 27min 21sec
  2. 2.             Henri Pélissier @ 44min 50sec
  3. 3.             Jean Rossius @ 55min 38sec

Stage 10: Thursday, July 16, Nice – Grenoble, 323 km

Major ascents: Allos, Bayard

  1. 1.             Henri Pélissier: 13hr 22min 3sec
  2. 2.             Jean Alavoine s.t.
  3. 3.             Firmin Lambot s.t.
  4. 4.             Philippe Thys s.t.
  5. 5.             Gustave Garrigou @ 11min 18sec
  6. 6.             Hector Tiberghien s.t.
  7. 7.             Emile Georget @ 13min 53sec
  8. 8.             Jean Rossius @ 17min 58sec
  9. 9.             Alfons Spiessens @ 35min 7sec
  10. 10.         Ernest Paul s.t.

GC after Stage 10:

  1. 1.             Philippe Thys: 135gr 49min 24sec
  2. 2.             Henri Pélissier @ 34min 27sec
  3. 3.             Jean Alavoine @ 47min 50sec

Stage 11: Saturday, July 18, Grenoble – Geneva, 325 km

Major ascents: Lautaret, Galibier, Aravis

  1. 1.             Gustave Garrigou: 12hr 29min 6sec
  2. 2.             Henri Pélissier s.t.
  3. 3.             Philippe Thys s.t.
  4. 4.             Paul Duboc @ 11min 36sec
  5. 5.             Jean Alavoine @ 16min 38sec
  6. 6.             Jean Rossius s.t.
  7. 7.             Hector Tiberghien s.t.
  8. 8.             Henri Devroye s.t.
  9. 9.             François Faber @ 31min 27sec
  10. 10.         Firmin Lambot @ 32min 30sec

GC after Stage 11:

  1. 1.             Philippe Thys: 148hr 18min 30sec
  2. 2.             Henri Pélissier @ 34min 27sec
  3. 3.             Jean Alavoine @ 1hr 4min 28sec

DSC_1696Legends of the Tour de France

Stage 12: Monday, July 20, Geneva – Belfort, 325 km

Major ascents: Faucille, Ballon d’Alsace

  1. 1.             Henri Pélissier: 12hr 32min 5sec
  2. 2.             Jean Alavoine @ 1min 15sec
  3. 3.             Paul Duboc @ 2min 20sec
  4. 4.             Jean Rossius @ 2min 37sec
  5. 5.             Maurice Brocco s.t.
  6. 6.             Philippe Thys s.t.
  7. 7.             Firmin Lambot @ 3min 54sec
  8. 8.             Jacques Coomans @ 7min 4sec
  9. 9.             Emile Georget s.t.
  10. 10.         Hector Tiberghien s.t.

GC after stage 12:

  1. 1.             Philippe Thys: 160hr 50min 35sec
  2. 2.             Henri Pélissier @ 31min 50sec
  3. 3.             Jean Alavoine @ 1hr 13min 6sec

Stage 13: Wednesday, July 22, Belfort – Longwy, 325 km

Major ascents: Ballon d’Alsace, Grosse-Pierre

  1. 1.             François Faber: 10hr 30min 44sec
  2. 2.             Henri Pélissier @ 6min 18sec
  3. 3.             Jean Alavoine s.t.
  4. 4.             Philippe Thys s.t.
  5. 5.             Jean Rossius s.t.
  6. 6.             Hector Tiberghien s.t.
  7. 7.             Charles Charron s.t.
  8. 8.             Paul Duboc s.t.
  9. 9.             Don Kirkham s.t.
  10. 10.         Emile Georget s.t.

GC after Stage 13:

  1. 1.             Philippe Thys: 171hr 27min 37sec
  2. 2.             Henri Pélissier @ 31min 50sec
  3. 3.             Jean Alavoine @ 1hr 13min 6sec

Stage 14: Friday, July 24, Longwy – Dunkerque, 390 km

  1. 1.             François Faber: 15hr 3min 16sec
  2. 2.             Henri Pélissier s.t.
  3. 3.             Philippe Thys s.t.
  4. 4.             Jean Alavoine @ 1min 21sec
  5. 5.             Emile Georget @ 5min 17sec
  6. 6.             Louis Trousselier s.t.
  7. 7.             Hector Tiberghien s.t.
  8. 8.             Alfons Spiessens s.t.
  9. 9.             Julien Tuytten s.t.
  10. 10.         Jean Rossius @ 6min 47sec

GC after Stage 14:

  1. 1.             Philippe Thys: 186hr 30min 53sec
  2. 2.             Henri Pélissier @ 1min 50sec
  3. 3.             Jean Alavoine @ 34min 27sec

Stage 15 (final stage): Sunday, July 26, Dunkerque – Paris, 340 km

  1. 1.             Henri Pélissier s.t.
  2. 2.             Jean Rossius s.t.
  3. 3.             Emile Wirtz s.t.
  4. 4.             Philippe Thys s.t.
  5. 5.             Louis Trousselier @ 1min 11sec
  6. 6.             François Faber @ 2min 1sec
  7. 7.             Oscar Egg s.t.
  8. 8.             Marcel Godiver s.t.
  9. 9.             Paul Duboc s.t.
  10. 10.         Ivor Munro s.t.

philippe-thys_show1914 Tour de France winner – Philippe Thys

TDF_front-cover-l

This excerpt is from the book “The Story of the Tour de France”, Volume 1 by Bill and Carol McGann. If you enjoyed it we hope you will consider purchasing the book, either print or electronic. The Amazon link here will make either purchase easy.

Follow Zdenko’s Corner on Facebook !

Share



Tags: ,



Gotta Comment?
If you've got a comment or opinion you'd like to share, send me an email or fill the comment fields bellow, with only requirements your name and email address. I might just publish you in glorious pixilated black & white! Comments may be edited for grammar, spelling and length, or just to make them better.

Submit your own stories for the Zdenko’s Corner about rides, Gran Fondo’s, having a good time traveling and/or cycling, Croatian cycling history, etc. All stories are very welcome. There are more than 400 stories already in this blog. The search feature at the top right, works best for finding subjects in the blog. There is also translating button at the top of every story so you can translate each page to language of your choice.

Send your comments to: zdenko@zkahlina.ca

2 comments to “1914 Tour de France”

  1. Comment by KBuckland:

    Hi,

    Nice Website, love the history.. I’m looking for more information on my great grandfather not sure if you would have anything but… I’m 29 and there is little information or photos, just family stories passed down… Figured it would be worth and ask. Thanks!

    15. Camille Botte (isole or independent)

    Keith

  2. Comment by Zdenko:

    Sorry Keith, I have no other information!

Leave a Reply