1936 Tour de France
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  Posted July 14th, 2013 by Zdenko  in Cycling | No comments yet.

Retrospective

Source: Bike Race Info portal

Backpedalling through the archives – 1936 Tour Quick Facts:
4,418 km raced at an average speed of 31.045 km/hr. 90 starters, 60 of whom are on national teams and 30 are touristes-routiers (independent riders). For complex political reasons, Italy did not send a team and a team of “Italians of France” was not allowed to start.

Bicycle_Tours_France_51CF0X

Tour father Henri Desgrange was too ill to direct the Tour and after the second stage, handed management of the Tour to Jacques Goddet. Belgian Sylvère Maes rode a masterful 16th stage while Antonin Magne cracked. The French team was unable to find the team unity needed to challenge the Belgians.

bidon_tour_de_france_1936Tour de France 1936 – National team France

Vervaecke was penalized 10 minutes in the 16th stage for using a bike with gears and another 1-minute penalty for getting an illegal feed from his wife. Magne got an illegal feed from Victor Fontan in the same stage and was penalized 5 minutes, the net effect was to move Magne to second place.

Time bonuses: 90 seconds and 45 seconds respectively for stage win and second place in case of a sprint. In case of a solo victory, the bonus is the time gap, up to 2 minutes. The same bonus applied to the the first rider to the top of rated mountains.

Tour_de_France_1936Tour de France 1936 route

The Story of the 1936 Tour de France (July 7 – Aug 2)
In 1936 the old lion Henri Desgrange, now 71 years old, needed kidney surgery a few weeks before the Tour started. Indomitable, he tried to follow his beloved Tour. He had a car fitted up with cushions to mitigate his discomfort. Recognizing the seriousness of his condition, his family and doctors begged him not to direct the race. “My duty is to be with the Tour,” he said. Being Desgrange, it was useless to try to dissuade him. But it was too much for the stubborn old man. After the second stage he handed the management of the race to Jacques Goddet, the son of Victor Goddet, the financial controller of L’Auto who had given his blessing to the start of the Tour back in 1903.

That was the last year Desgrange directed the Tour even though he visited the Tour and is listed as its Patron through 1939. He suffered declining health and died August 16, 1940 in his house on the French Riviera. Desgrange was always a competitor. In his final days as he was dying, he would force himself to walk across his bedroom with a stopwatch in his hand, trying to beat his previous time across the room.

1936desgrangeracingHenri Desgrange was first and foremost a competitor.

This would be a good time to look back at Desgrange. The Tour was not his idea. It was Géo Lefèvre’s. The idea of the newspaper L’Auto was not his, he was merely installed as its editor. Yet, he made both completely his with the strong force of his powerful personality. He created a brand new sport, stage racing. There were no rules for stage racing when he started. He had to make them up as he went. He was a dictator, but he was a scrupulous and fair one. Perhaps a benevolent dictator was needed in order to make sure this creation achieved a robust maturity.

He had no interest in advancing technology. His passion was the primitive struggle of a lone athlete against the terrain, elements, personal weakness and other equally dedicated competitors. The bicycle was almost an impediment to him. Mavic was producing aluminum rims by 1926, but Desgrange forbade them in his race until 1931, fearing that metal rims would not dissipate heat properly on long descents.

Gear changers were forbidden. Félicien Vervaecke would receive a 10-minute time penalty for using a derailleur on the Aubisque in the sixteenth stage of the 1936 Tour even though the touriste-routiers were using them and routinely beating the national team members to the tops of climbs. Desgrange may have been recovering at his home on the Riviera, but his rules were still in force.

Cailloux_Tour_1936Tour de France July 16, 1936. As if climbing the Galibier wasn’t enough, here’s what riders faced descending the other side! That’s Germany’s Erich Haendel with the cockeyed goggles.

I believe the Tour became the most important race in the world because of Desgrange’s basic integrity and adaptability. He was always willing to change his race as opportunities to improve it presented themselves. He set the tone and the culture in the Tour de France that made everyone believe that the race was terribly hard but very fair. It was worth winning and no one could second-guess the victor. It is on this count that the Giro falls flat and why to this day the Giro is a very important Italian regional race rather than a contender with the Tour for the race that matters most in the world. I believe Henri Desgrange is, by far, the most important man in the history of cycling.

Before he retired, Desgrange made a number of changes in the 1936 Tour. He reduced the number of time trials to 5, but he made them all team time trials—there were no individual time trials this year. He increased the number of rest days from 4 to 6. But he also squeezed 3 stages into 1 day.

Tour_1936_05Riders eat during the stage at 1936 Tour de France

The rider and team enrollment system was changed yet again. He made the major cycling nations, France, Germany, Belgium and a strange combination of Spain and Luxembourg have 10-man teams. Switzerland, Holland, Romania, Yugoslavia and Austria competed with 5-man teams. The touriste-routier classification was discarded, but the classification of individuals was retained, though no longer as national individuals.

Biciklizam2B_Ekipa TourRep JugoslavijeTeam Yugoslavia participated in the Tour de France 1936

At this time France was undergoing profound changes. In 1936 the Popular Front coalition was elected to run France under Prime Minister Léon Blum. The Popular Front was made up of socialists, communists and other radicals, who instituted a 40-hour workweek and a 2-week vacation. It’s amazing how a previous generation’s seemingly extreme reforms can become today’s basic human necessities. This paid 2-week vacation made it possible for more people than ever to watch the Tour.

Crowds line the Col du Tourmalet summit in the 1936 Tour de France.Crowds line the Col du Tourmalet summit in the 1936 Tour de France

The tensions between the European nations were growing. For decades Italy had been competing with Great Britain for influence and empire in East Africa. Italy under Mussolini, desirous of establishing an African empire, invaded Ethiopia in 1935. The world reacted with almost unanimous condemnation. I’ve never understood, however, how countries like France with her African and far-eastern colonies, Belgium with her stomach-turning record in the Congo, or Britain, suppressing Gandhi and the Indians working to throw off the colonial yoke, could be so outraged at Italy’s only wanting to join the same club of colonial oppressors. For the purposes of this history, the result was that the Italians did not send a team to the 1936 Tour. The great Tour de France writer Pierre Chany put it thus, “The Italians had decided to stay away for political reasons. The country had engaged in a difficult war in Ethiopia and the fascist government, condemned by the League of Nations, had broken off relations with the outside world.”

Tour_1936_061936 Tour… in the mountains

A group of Italians who said they were French residents, including Raffaele Di Paco and Jules Rossi, were allowed to enroll. Numbers 41 through 50 were reserved for them, but then Tour officials changed their minds and did not allow them to start.

The French team retained many of its core riders from its glory days in the first half of the 1930s. Antonin Magne, Georges Speicher, Maurice Archambaud and René Le Grevès, all with extensive Tour experience, planned to regain the winning ways they had known just 2 short years before.

Octave Lapize was the first Tour de France cyclist to top the Col du TourmaletOctave Lapize was the first Tour de France cyclist to top the Col du Tourmalet.

Belgium fielded a superb team starting with last year’s winner, Romain Maes. Sylvère Maes (no relation to Romain), who had ridden in 1935 as a Belgianindividuel and finished fourth was now part of the Belgian team. Félicien Vervaecke, so valuable to Romain Maes on the climbs, returned. This was also the first Tour for Marcel Kint, “the Black Eagle”, one of those super-tough Belgian roadmen who seem to be able to take anything a race or the elements will dish out.

Germany put 10 men on the road at the start. None made it to Paris. None of the 4-man teams of Austria, Romania and Yugoslavia was able to finish the Tour either. The first African in Tour history entered. Abd-el-Kader Abbes, an Algerian, rode as an individuel. He finished 42nd out of 43 finishers. Not bad when one considers that 90 riders started.

The beginning of the 1936 Tour is mostly remembered for its terrible, torrential rains. The racers were forced to ride on streets flooded almost axle-deep at times. For 7 days the riders were lashed with terrible weather.

1936-1-tappa-strade-allagatStage 1: The apocalyptic rains may have made for miserable racing, but they didn’t stop the Tour.

Paul Egli won the first stage making him the first Swiss rider in Tour history to wear the Yellow Jersey. The next day Maurice Archambaud was able to take advantage of his second place in the first stage. Egli missed the big move in stage 2, finishing almost 10 minutes behind the leaders. Archambaud regained the Yellow Jersey that he had last worn during the eleventh stage of the 1933 Tour. It must have felt good to put it on and finally again be a Frenchman back in the lead of the Tour de France. Notably, Antonin Magne, Sylvère and Romain Maes were all in the front group and retained their General Classification competitiveness.

The rains continued. Gaps continually opened up with the race being conducted under appalling conditions. Luxembourger Arsène Mersch took the lead from Archambaud after the third stage. The next day Archambaud won the stage and regained the lead when the Tour went over the Ballon d’Alsace. Again, Magne and Sylvère Maes stayed close to the action.

1936-4-tappa-Ezquerra-sul-BStage 4: Spanish rider Federico Ezquerra climbs the Ballon d’Alsace. He finished the day second to Archambaud.

Before the real racing began in the Alps in stage 6 with the Aravis and Tamié climbs, the General Classification stood thus:

1. Maurice Archambaud
2. Sylvère Maes @ 3 minutes 37 seconds
3. Robert Wierinckx @ 3 minutes 44 seconds

The first Alpine stage didn’t change the dynamics of the race as 17 riders, including almost all of the real contenders, finished together at Aix-les-Bains. The notable exception was René Vietto who quit after 2 broken chains.

Stage 7, with the Télégraphe prelude to the mighty Galibier, followed by the Lautaret climb, did alter the race, but did not change the top 2 places of the General Classification podium. Wierinckx lost his third place to Pierre Clemens of Luxembourg.

Tour de France, 1935. Roman Maes took the first stage, wore the yellowTour de France, 1935. Roman Maes took the first stage, wore the yellow

Romain Maes was first over the Télégraphe but then abandoned. Maes had been frequently ill the entire spring of 1936. He was dogged by a strange fever that came and went. He trained when he could and rested when he had to. He never consulted a doctor and lived on aspirin. He entered Paris-Roubaix and crossed the finish line first, but a judging error placed him second. The judges gave the win to Georges Speicher and they would not correct their mistake. There is a famous photograph of the 2 riders crossing the line, making the injustice to Maes very clear.

Owen Mulholland writes: “[Maes] never truly recaptured his old form. In Maes’ own words: ‘In the Tour de France, I attempted the impossible. But I was forced to abandon, incapable of breathing on the Galibier stage.’ When he returned to Belgium and finally consulted a doctor he was informed that he was a victim of chronic bronchitis. The condition was so serious that he was ordered to quit racing for a year, if not more. At his peak he was described by [Tour historian] Théo Mathy, ‘Romain Maes is an electric pile. He sleeps poorly. He doesn’t recover easily. He has the class, but he lives on his nerves. With him, it’s all or nothing.’ “

tour de france in the early 1930s wow how things have changedTour de France in the early 1930s – wow how things have changed!

Georges Speicher crashed descending the Galibier. His Tour was also over.

Stage 8 was one of the 1936 Tour’s pivotal stages. The 194-kilometer stage from Grenoble to Briançon ascended the 900-meter Laffrey and then the 1,248-meter Bayard. It was too much for Archambaud, the man Desgrange had nicknamed “Chubby Cheeks”. Individuel Jean-Marie Goasmat won the stage but in the first group of chasers a little over 6 minutes behind him were Magne, Sylvère Maes and Luxembourg rider Pierre Clemens.

This left the General Classification thus:

1. Sylvère Maes
2. Pierre Clemens @ 1 minute 10 seconds
3. Antonin Magne @ 1 minute 35 seconds

Magne, riding conservatively throughout the first part of the Tour, must have thought the situation perfectly manageable. There was a lot of Tour left and he was sitting less than 2 minutes behind Maes. The following day was a brutal stage going from Briançon to Digne. For the first time since 1927 the Tour included the Izoard. This massive mountain was followed by the Vars and the Allos. Magne attacked on the Izoard but was unable to shake Maes. Maes not only avoided being dropped, he was the first over the Izoard’s crest. Later in the stage Maes flatted. But unlike their teams in the early 1930s, the Belgians now had that same team spirit that had earlier motivated the French. The Belgians, called the “Black Guard” for their team jerseys, resolutely worked to bring him back up to the front of the field. At the end of the stage the finishing group of 7 included Maes, Clemens and Belgian climber Vervaecke. It did not contain Magne. Magne lost about a minute on the day he had planned to take the Yellow.

Tour_1936_08Crossing the mountains

Maes took another bite out of Magne in the final Alpine stage, number 11 from Nice to Cannes. This stage, over the maritime Alps, cost Magne another precious minute.

So, here were the standings after the Alps and before the Pyrenees:

1. Sylvère Maes
2. Félicien Vervaecke @ 2 minutes 48 seconds
3. Antonin Magne @ 3 minutes 49 seconds

TDF_1936_It's about taking a fall and getting back up again. (Georges SpeicherIt’s about taking a fall and getting back up again. (Georges Speicher. 1936 Tour de France)

Between the Alps and the Pyrenees there were 2 team time trials. They presented a reversal of fortune from the previous year. In 1935, even though the French did not have a man who could win the overall lead, collectively they were still powerful and could win the team time trials. This year the Belgians won both of the intermountain team tests. The result was to push Antonin Magne ever further behind. Before stage 15, the first Pyreneen stage, Magne was still in third place, but now about 8 minutes behind Maes.

Even though the Perpignan to Luchon stage, so often pivotal in the Tour’s history, included the Puymorens, the Port, the Portet d’Aspet and the Ares climbs, the podium didn’t change. Maes, Magne, Vervaecke and Swiss rider Léo Amberg all finished together, a half-minute behind the winner, Sauveur Ducazeaux, another superb individuel.

But stage 16. That was the stage that finally decided the Tour. The 4 colossal mountains scheduled in the ride from Luchon to Pau were the Peyresourde, the Aspin, the Tourmalet and the Aubisque. Magne thought that this intimidating stage would be his last real chance to take back the lead, since this stage signaled the end of any substantial climbing. After that there were still 3 more team time trials, which had so far played to the advantage of the Belgians.

Tour_1936_071936 Tour – Bad roads

Magne just could not do it. He attacked Maes on the Tourmalet and blew up. He ended up losing 18 minutes when time bonuses and penalties were figured in. And Sylvère Maes? He won the stage after being first over the last 2 climbs, the Tourmalet and the Aubisque. Félicien Vervaecke had been policing Magne for his team leader when he flatted on the Aubisque. Vervaecke borrowed a derailleur-equipped bike to finish the stage, but a derailleur was still a forbidden piece of equipment for a national team rider. Only the individuels could use them. That’s one reason why the individuels often did as well or better on the big passes in the mid to late 1930s. Vervaecke was penalized 10 minutes for using the gear-equipped bike. Magne also received a penalty, having gotten an illegal feed from retired French racer Victor Fontan.

After all the climbing, here’s where things stood at the beginning of stage 17:

1. Sylvère Maes
2. Antonin Magne @ 26 minutes 13 seconds
3. Félicien Vervaecke @ 28 minutes 38 seconds

Tour_1935_03Forever changing, always a different road to the finish.

Stage 18b was another team time trial and the Belgians continued to pour it on. Magne lost another 2 minutes. The next day, another team time trial. The Belgians won again and this time let Vervaecke be first across the line. With the time bonus for winning the stage he was now sitting in second and Magne pushed to third place. This day, Friday July 31, was the first time the Tour had squeezed 3 stages into one day. It would be about 50 years before the riders would strike and end this particular abuse.

Le Miroir_1936

The penultimate stage was the final team time trial. The French dug deeply and finally won one. With that effort Magne pulled himself back up to second place. The Belgians, through excellent teamwork and the presence of a superb rider in Sylvère Maes kept the Yellow Jersey from stage 8 until the end.

The French did have a worthy successor to sprinter Charles Pélissier. French team member René Le Grevès won 6 stages. Not since the pre-war glory days of François Faber had the riders of Luxembourg done so well. 3 men from the tiny country made the top 10.

Tour 1936 video:

http://firstpost.com/topic/event/tour-de-france-tour-de-france-1936-13-video-WHVK8Y7vQL4-79037-4.html

1936 Tour de France Complete Final General Classification:

  1. 1.      Sylvère Maes (Belgium): 142hr 47min 32sec
  2. 2.      Antonin Magne (France) @ 26min 55sec
  3. 3.      Félicien Vervaecke (Belgium) @ 27min 55sec
  4. 4.      Pierre Clemens (Spain-Luxembourg) @42min 42sec
  5. 5.      Arsène Mersch (Spain-Luxembourg) @ 53min 24sec
  6. 6.      Mariano Cañardo (Spain-Luxembourg) @ 1hr 3min 4sec
  7. 7.      Mathias Clemens (Spain-Luxembourg) @ 1hr 10min 44sec
  8. 8.      Léo Amberg (Switzerland) @ 1hr 19min 13sec
  9. 9.      Marcel Kint (Belgium) @ 1hr 22min 25sec
  10. 10.  Léon Level (touriste-routier) @ 1hr 27min 57sec
  11. 11.  Julian Berrendero (Spain-Luxembourg) @ 1hr 34min 37sec
  12. 12.  Sylvain Marcaillou (touriste-routier) @ 1hr 38min 6sec
  13. 13.  Louis Thiétard (touriste-routier) @ 1hr 47min 47sec
  14. 14.  Raoul Lesueur (France) @ 1hr 50min 15sec
  15. 15.  Albert Van Schendel (Holland) @ 1hr 52min 23sec
  16. 16.  Pierre Cogan (France) @ 1hr 52min 48sec
  17. 17.  Federico Ezquerra (Spain-Luxembourg) @ 1hr 54min 39sec
  18. 18.  Robert Tanneveau (France) @ 1hr 57min 9sec
  19. 19.  François Neuville (Belgium) @ 2hr 1min 16sec
  20. 20.  René Le Grevès (France) @ 2hr 7min 45sec
  21. 21.  Yvan Marie (touriste-routier) @ 2hr 8min 46sec
  22. 22.  Pierre Cloarec (touriste-routier) @ 2hr 13min 53sec
  23. 23.  Theo Middlekamp (Holland) @ 2hr 16min 33sec
  24. 24.  Emiliano Alvarez (Spain) @ 2hr 26min 0sec
  25. 25.  Charles Berty (touriste-routier) @ 2hr 28min 48sec
  26. 26.  Cyriel Van Overberghe (Belgium) @ 2hr 30min 14sec
  27. 27.  Alphonse Antoine (touriste-routier) @ 2hr 31min 27sec
  28. 28.  Jean-Marie Goasmat (touriste-routier) @ 2hr 34min 22sec
  29. 29.  Arthur Debruyckere (France) @ 2hr 34min 38sec
  30. 30.  Fernand Lemay (touriste-routier) @ 2hr 51min 49sec
  31. 31.  Albert Hendrickx (Belgium) @ 2hr 57min 26sec
  32. 32.  Antoon Van Schendel (Holland) @ 3hr 14min 57sec
  33. 33.  Paul Maye (France) @ 3hr 15min 58sec
  34. 34.  Eloi Meulenberg (Belgium) @ 3hr 27min 32sec
  35. 35.  Marcel Walle (touriste-routier) @ 3hr 29min 14sec
  36. 36.  Raymond Passat (touriste-routier) @ 3hr 33min 58sec
  37. 37.  Saveur Ducazeaux (touriste-routier) @ 3hr 18min 18sec
  38. 38.  Edmond Pages (touriste-routier) @ 3hr 48min 26sec
  39. 39.  Gabriel Dubois (touriste-routier) @ 4hr 9min 18sec
  40. 40.  Fabien Galateau (touriste-routier) @ 4hr 21min 35sec
  41. 41.  Antoine Latorre (touriste-routier) @ 4hr 23min 16sec
  42. 42.  Abd-el-Kader Abbes (touriste-routier) @ 4hr 43min 33sec
  43. 43.  Aldo Bertocco (touriste-routier) @ 4hr 49min 7sec

Climbers’ Competition:

  1. 1.      Julian Berrendero (Spain-Luxembourg): 132 points
  2. 2.      Sylvère Maes (Belgium): 112
  3. 3.      Federico Ezquerra (Spain-Luxembourg): 99

1936 Tour stage results with running GC:

Stage 1: Tuesday, July 7. Paris – Lille, 258 km

Places 7 – 13 given same time and place.

  1. 1.      Paul Egli: 7hr 6min 18sec
  2. 2.      Maurice Archambaud s.t.
  3. 3.      Decimo Bettini @ 5sec
  4. 4.      Gustave Danneels @ 57sec
  5. 5.      Max Bulla @ 1min 7sec
  6. 6.      Erich Bautz s.t.
  7. 7.      René Le Grevès, Pierre-Marie Cloarec, Josef Arents, Mariano Cañardo @ 1min 14sec

GC after Stage 1:

Given the time bonuses in play, Egli should have been given a 90 second bonus and Archambaud 45, but I have no GC results that reflect this.

  1. 1.      Paul Egli
  2. 2.      Maurice Archambaud
  3. 3.      Decino Bettini

Stage 2: Wednesday, July 8, Lille – Charleville, 192 km

In Charleville, Tour father Henri Desgrange is too ill to continue following and managing the Tour and hands the job of running the Tour to his successor, Jacques Goddet.

Places 10 – 34 given same time and place.

  1. 1.      Robert Wierinckx: 5hr 32min 21sec
  2. 2.      Robert Tanneveau s.t.
  3. 3.      Albert Van Schendel @ 23sec
  4. 4.      Paul Maye @ 36sec
  5. 5.      Gistave Danneels s.t.
  6. 6.      René Le Grevès s.t.
  7. 7.      Amédée Fournier s.t.
  8. 8.      Romain Maes s.t.
  9. 9.      Albert Hendrickx s.t.
  10. 10.  François Neuville s.t.

GC after Stage 2:

  1. 1.      Maurice Archambaud: 12hr 38min 30sec
  2. 2.      Decimo Bettini @ 50sec
  3. 3.      Gustave Danneels @ 1min 42sec

Stage 3: Thursday, July 9, Charleville – Metz, 161 km

  1. 1.      Mathias Clemens: 4hr 22min 22sec
  2. 2.      François Neuville @ 35sec
  3. 3.      Alphonse Antoine s.t.
  4. 4.      Paul Egli s.t.
  5. 5.      Arsène Mersch s.t.
  6. 6.      Yvan Marie s.t.
  7. 7.      Federico Ezquerra @ 1min 58sec
  8. 8.      Bruno Roth @ 2min
  9. 9.      Paul Maye @ 2min 5sec
  10. 10.  Robert Wierinckx s.t.

GC after stage 3:

  1. 1.      Arsène Mersch: 17hr 3min 26sec
  2. 2.      Yvan Marie @ 31sec
  3. 3.      Maurice Archambaud @ 57sec

Stage 4: Friday, July 10, Metz – Belfort, 220 km

Major ascent: Ballon d’Alsace

  1. 1.      Maurice Archambaud: 6hr 50min 26sec
  2. 2.      Federico Ezquerra s.t.
  3. 3.      François Neuville @ 18sec
  4. 4.      Antonin Magne s.t.
  5. 5.      Léo Amberg s.t.
  6. 6.      Mathias Clemens s.t.
  7. 7.      Marcel Kint s.t.
  8. 8.      Sylvère Maes s.t.
  9. 9.      Gustave Danneels @ 47sec
  10. 10.  Pierre Clemens @ 57sec

GC after stage 4:

  1. 1.      Maurice Archambaud: 23hr 53min 29sec
  2. 2.      Arsène Mersch @ 1min 49sec
  3. 3.      Sylvère Maes @ 3min 27sec

Stage 5: Satrday, July 11, Belfort – Evian, 298 km

Places 6 – 31 given same time and place

Major ascent: Faucille

  1. 1.      René Le Grevès: 9hr 33min 45sec
  2. 2.      Robert Wierinckx s.t.
  3. 3.      Gustave Danneels s.t.
  4. 4.      Aldo Bertocco s.t.
  5. 5.      Georges Speicher s.t.
  6. 6.      Maurice Archambaud, Antonin Magne, Pierre Clemens, Fernand Mithouard, Pierre Cogan, etc. s.t.

GC after Stage 5:

  1. 1.      Maurice Archambaud: 33hr 27min 14sec
  2. 2.      Sylvère Maes @ 3min 37sec
  3. 3.      Robert Wierinckx @ 3min 44sec

Stage 6: Monday, July 13, Evian – Aix les Bains, 212 km

Places 7 – 17 got the same time and place.

Major ascents: Aravis, Tamié

  1. 1.      Eloi Meulenberg: 6hr 24min 51sec
  2. 2.      Antonin Magne s.t.
  3. 3.      Arsène Mersch s.t.
  4. 4.      François Neuville s.t.
  5. 5.      Abert Van Schendel s.t
  6. 6.      Maurice Archambaud s.t.
  7. 7.      Mariano Cañardo, Julian Berrendero, Arthur Debruycker, Pierre Cogan, etc. s.t.

GC after stage 6:

  1. 1.      Maurice Archambaud: 39hr 52min 5sec
  2. 2.      Sylvère Maes @ 3min 37sec
  3. 3.      Robert Wierinckx @ 3min 44sec

Stage 7: Tuesday, July 14, Aix les Bains – Grenoble, 230 km

Major ascents: Télégraphe, Galibier, Lautaret

  1. 1.      Théo Middelkamp: 8hr 32min 2sec
  2. 2.      Maurice Archambaud s.t.
  3. 3.      Léon Level s.t.
  4. 4.      Charles Berty s.t.
  5. 5.      Mathias Clemens s.t.
  6. 6.      Fernand Lemay s.t.
  7. 7.      Sylvère Maes s.t.
  8. 8.      Pierre Clemens s.t.
  9. 9.      Julian Berrendero s.t.
  10. 10.  Federico Ezquerra s.t.

GC after stage 7:

  1. 1.      Maurice Archambaud: 48hr 23min 22sec
  2. 2.      Sylvère Maes @ 4min 22sec
  3. 3.      Pierre Clemens @ 5min 32sec

Stage 8: Wednesday, July 15, Grenoble – Briançon, 194 km

Major ascents: Côte de Laffrey, Bayard

  1. 1.      Jean-Marie Goasmat: 6hr 15min 32sec
  2. 2.      Piarre-Marie Cloarec @ 4min 6sec
  3. 3.      Arsène Mersch @ 6min 21sec
  4. 4.      Antonin Magne s.t.
  5. 5.      Yvon Marie s.t.
  6. 6.      Sylvain Marcaillou s.t.
  7. 7.      Sylvère Maes s.t.
  8. 8.      Pierre Clemens s.t.
  9. 9.      Mathias Clemens s.t.
  10. 10.  Mariano Cañardo s.t.

24. Maurice Archambaud @ 14min 17sec

Gc after stage 8:

  1. 1.      Sylvère Maes: 54hr 49min 37sec
  2. 2.      Pierre Clemens @ 1min 10sec
  3. 3.      Antonin Magne @ 1min 35sec

Stage 9: Thursday, July 16, Briançon – Digne, 220 km

Major ascents: Izoard, Vars, Allos

  1. 1.      Léon Level: 8hr 6min 15sec
  2. 2.      Louis Thiétard s.t.
  3. 3.      Mariano Cañardo s.t.
  4. 4.      Sylvère Maes s.t.
  5. 5.      Pierre Clemens s.t.
  6. 6.      Félicien Vervaecke s.t.
  7. 7.      Julian Berrendero s.t.
  8. 8.      Antonin Magne @ 57sec
  9. 9.      Marcel Kint @ 1min 53sec
  10. 10.  Aldo Bertocco @ 7min 7sec

GC after Stage 9:

  1. 1.      Sylvère Maes: 62hr 55min 52sec
  2. 2.      Pierre Clemens @ 1min 10sec
  3. 3.      Antonin Magne @ 2min 32sec

Stage 10: Saturday, July 18, Digne – Nice, 156 km

Places 9 – 39 got same time and place

  1. 1.      Paul Maye: 4hr 44min 16sec
  2. 2.      Théo Heimann s.t.
  3. 3.      Albert Hendrickx s.t.
  4. 4.      René Le Grevès @ 3min 33sec
  5. 5.      Sauveur Ducazeaux s.t.
  6. 6.      Robert Wierinckx s.t.
  7. 7.      Alphonse Antoine s.t.
  8. 8.      Arsène Mersch s.t.
  9. 9.      Abdel-Kader Abbes, Léo Amberg, etc. s.t.

GC after Stage 10:

  1. 1.      Sylvère Maes: 67hr 43min 39sec
  2. 2.      Pierre Clemens @ 1min 12sec
  3. 3.      Antonin Magne @ 2min 34sec

Stage 11: Sunday, July 19, Nice – Cannes, 126 km

Major ascents: Braus, Castillon, La Turbie

  1. 1.      Federico Ezquerra: 4hr 3min 18sec
  2. 2.      Sylvère Maes @ 1min 46sec
  3. 3.      Félicien Vervaecke s.t.
  4. 4.      Antonin Magne @ 2min 16sec
  5. 5.      Pierre Cogan @ 2min 21sec
  6. 6.      Louis Thiétard @ 2min 27sec
  7. 7.      Mariano Cañardo @ 3min 51sec
  8. 8.      Sylvain Marcaillou s.t.
  9. 9.      Aldo Bertocco @ 6min 10sec
  10. 10.  Léo Amberg s.t.

GC after Stage 11:

  1. 1.      Sylvère Maes: 71hr 47min 58sec
  2. 2.      Félicien Vervaecke @ 2min 48sec
  3. 3.      Antonin Magne @ 3min 49sec

Stage 12: Tuesday, July 21, Cannes – Marseille, 195 km

Places 9 – 34 given same time and place

  1. 1.      René Le Grevès: 6hr 36min 10sec
  2. 2.      Eloi Meulenberg s.t.
  3. 3.      Marcel Kint s.t.
  4. 4.      François Neuville s.t.
  5. 5.      Sylvain Marcaillou s.t.
  6. 6.      Antonin Magne s.t.
  7. 7.      Théo Heimann s.t.
  8. 8.      Louis Thiétard s.t.
  9. 9.      Gabriel Dubois, Pierre Cogan, etc. s.t.

GC after Stage 12:

  1. 1.      Sylvère Maes: 78hr 24min 8sec
  2. 2.      Félicien Vervaecke @ 2min 48sec
  3. 3.      Antonin Magne @ 3min 49sec

Stage 13A: Wednesday, July 22, Marseille – Nîmes, 112 km

Places 8 – 54 given same time and place

  1. 1.      René Le Greves: 4hr 12min 15sec
  2. 2.      Eloi Meulenberg s.t.
  3. 3.      Paul Maye s.t.
  4. 4.      Louis Thiétard s.t.
  5. 5.      Sylvain Marcaillou s.t.
  6. 6.      Théo Middelkamp s.t.
  7. 7.      Sauveur Ducazeaux s.t.
  8. 8.      Decimo Bettini, Charles Berty, Alphonse Antoine, etc. s.t.

GC after stage 13A:

  1. 1.      Sylvère Maes: 82hr 36min 23sec
  2. 2.      Félicien Vervaecke @ 2min 48sec
  3. 3.      Antonin Magne @ 3min 49sec

Stage 13B: Wednesday, July 22, Nîmes – Montpellier 52 km Team Time Trial

  1. 1.      Sylvère Maes: 1hr 9min 31sec
  2. 2.      Félicien Vervaecke s.t.
  3. 3.      Albert Hendrickx s.t.
  4. 4.      Marcel Kint s.t.
  5. 5.      François Neuville s.t.
  6. 6.      Cyriel Van Overberghe s.t.
  7. 7.      Antonin Magne @ 57sec
  8. 8.      René Le Grevès s.t.
  9. 9.      Raoul Lesueur s.t.
  10. 10.  Paul Maye s.t.
  11. 11.  Pierre Cogan s.t.
  12. 12.  Rober Tanneveau s.t.
  13. 13.  Arthur Debruycker @ 1min 53sec
  14. 14.  Federico Ezquerra @ 2min 47sec
  15. 15.  Mariano Cañardo s.t.

GC after Stage 13B:

  1. 1.      Sylvère Maes: 83hr 44min 24sec
  2. 2.      Félicien Vervaecke @ 3min 33sec
  3. 3.      Antonin Magne @ 6min 16sec

Stage 14A: Thursday, July 23, Montpellier – Narbonne, 103 km

Places 7 – 39 given same time and place

  1. 1.      René Le Grevès: 3hr 25min 40sec
  2. 2.      Eloi Meulenberg s.t.
  3. 3.      Aldo Bertocco s.t.
  4. 4.      Paul Maye s.t.
  5. 5.      Louis Thiétard s.t.
  6. 6.      Théo Middelkamp s.t.
  7. 7.      Pierre-Marie Cloarec, Decimo Bettini, Charles Berty, Alphonse Antoine, etc. s.t.

GC after stage 14A:

  1. 1.      Sylvère Maes: 87hr 10min 44sec
  2. 2.      Félicien Vervaecke @ 3min 33sec
  3. 3.      Antonin Magne @ 6min 16sec

Stage 14B: Thursday, July 23, Narbonne – Perpignan 63 km Team Time Trial

  1. 1.      Sylvère Maes: 1hr 35min 18sec
  2. 2.      Félicien Vervaecke s.t.
  3. 3.      François Neuville s.t.
  4. 4.      Marcel Kint s.t.
  5. 5.      Antonin Magne @ 23sec
  6. 6.      René Le Grevès s.t.
  7. 7.      Robert Tanneveau s.t.
  8. 8.      Raoul Lesueur s.t.
  9. 9.      Pierre Cogan s.t.
  10. 10.  Arsène Mersch @ 1min 58sec

GC after stage 14B:

  1. 1.      Sylvère Maes: 88hr 43min 52sec
  2. 2.      Félicien Vervaecke @ 4min 18sec
  3. 3.      Antonin Magne @ 8min 9sec

Tour_1936_04Tour de France 1936

Stage 15: Saturday, July 25: Perpignan – Luchon, 325 km

Major ascents: Puymorens, Port, Portet d’Aspet, Ares

  1. 1.      Sauveur Ducazeaux: 11hr 57min 32sec
  2. 2.      Arsène Mersch s.t.
  3. 3.      Léo Amberg @ 35sec
  4. 4.      Sylvain Marcaillou s.t.
  5. 5.      Sylvère Maes s.t.
  6. 6.      Antonin Magne s.t.
  7. 7.      Félicien Vervaecke s.t.
  8. 8.      Louis Thiétard @ 3min 40sec
  9. 9.      Raoul Lesueur s.t.
  10. 10.  Théo Middelkamp s.t.

GC after Stage 15:

  1. 1.      Sylvère Maes: 100hr 41min 59sec
  2. 2.      Félicien Vervaecke @ 4min 18sec
  3. 3.      Antonin Magne @ 8min 9sec

Stage 16: Monday, July 27, Luchon – Pau, 194 km

Major ascents: Peyresourde, Aspin, Tourmalet, Aubisque

  1. 1.      Sylvère Maes: 7hr 12min 52sec
  2. 2.      Léon Level @ 8min 39sec
  3. 3.      Mariano Cañardo @ 8min 55sec
  4. 4.      Paul Maye @ 11min 54sec
  5. 5.      Charles Berty s.t.
  6. 6.      Sylvain Marcaillou s.t.
  7. 7.      Léo Amberg s.t.
  8. 8.      Pierre Clemens @ 12min 1sec
  9. 9.      Antonin Magne @ 12min 39sec
  10. 10.  Louis Thiétard @ 13min 57sec

22. Félicien Vervaecke @ 19min 55sec

GC after Stage 16:

  1. 1.      Sylvère Maes: 107hr 50min 26sec
  2. 2.      Antonin Magne @ 26min 13sec
  3. 3.      Félicien Vervaecke @ 28min 38sec

Stage 17: Wednesday, July 29, Pau – Bordeaux, 229 km

Places 7 – 40 given same time and place

  1. 1.      René Le Grevès: 7hr 20min 25sec
  2. 2.      Eloi Meulenberg s.t.
  3. 3.      Paul Maye s.t.
  4. 4.      Aldo Bertocco s.t.
  5. 5.      François Neuville s.t.
  6. 6.      Sauveur Ducazeaux s.t.
  7. 7.      Alphonse Antoine, Charles Berty, Abdel-Kader Abbes, Antoon Van Schendel, etc. s.t.

GC after Stage 17:

  1. 1.      Sylvère Maes: 115hr 10min 51sec
  2. 2.      Antonin Magne @ 26min 13sec
  3. 3.      Félicien Vervaecke @ 28min 38sec

Stage 18A: Thursday, July 30, Bordeaux – Saintes, 117 km

  1. 1.      Eloi Meulenberg: 3hr 30min 7sec
  2. 2.      René Le Greves s.t.
  3. 3.      Julian Berrendero s.t.
  4. 4.      Louis Thiétard s.t.
  5. 5.      Léo Amberg s.t.
  6. 6.      Sauveur Ducazeaux s.t.
  7. 7.      François Neuville s.t.
  8. 8.      Antoon Van Schendel s.t.
  9. 9.      Léon Level s.t.
  10. 10.  Edmond Pages s.t.

GC after Stage 18A:

  1. 1.      Sylvère Maes: 118hr 44min 23sec
  2. 2.      Antonin Magne @ 26min 13sec
  3. 3.      Félicien Vervaecke @ 28min 38sec

Stage 18B: Thursday, July 30, Saintes – La Rochelle 75 km Team Time Trial

  1. 1.      Sylvère Maes: 1hr 46min 53sec
  2. 2.      Félicien Vervaecke s.t.
  3. 3.      Marcel Kint s.t.
  4. 4.      Albert Henderickx s.t.
  5. 5.      Antonin Magne @ 20sec
  6. 6.      Raoul Lesueur s.t.
  7. 7.      Arthur Debruycker s.t.
  8. 8.      Pierre Cogan s.t.
  9. 9.      Rober Tanneveau s.t.
  10. 10.  Cyriel Van Overberghe @ 2min 52sec

GC after Stage 18B:

  1. 1.      Sylvère Maes: 120hr 29min 46sec
  2. 2.      Antonin Magne @ 28min 3sec
  3. 3.      Félicien Vervaecke @ 29min 23sec

Stage 19A: Friday, July 31: La Rochelle – La Roche sur Yon, 81 km

  1. 1.      Marcel Kint: 2hr 49min 29sec
  2. 2.      Louis Thiétard s.t.
  3. 3.      Sylvain Marcaillou s.t.
  4. 4.      Alphonse Antoine s.t.
  5. 5.      Arsène Mersch s.t.
  6. 6.      Charles Berty s.t.
  7. 7.      Fabien Galateau s.t.
  8. 8.      Gabriel Dubois s.t.
  9. 9.      Albert Van Schendel s.t.
  10. 10.  Léo Amberg @ 2min 9sec

GC after Stage 19A:

  1. 1.      Sylvère Maes: 123hr 24min 56sec
  2. 2.      Antonin Magne @ 28min 3sec
  3. 3.      Félicien Vervaecke @ 29min 23sec

Stage 19B: Friday, July 31, La Roche sur Yon – Cholet 65 km Team Time Trial

  1. 1.      Félicien Vervaecke: 1hr 33min 6sec
  2. 2.      Marcel Kint s.t.
  3. 3.      Sylvère Maes s.t.
  4. 4.      Eloi Meuklenberg s.t.
  5. 5.      Cyriel Van Overberghe s.t.
  6. 6.      Albert Hendrickx s.t.
  7. 7.      François Neuville s.t.
  8. 8.      Théo Middelkamp @ 1min 24sec
  9. 9.      Albert Van Schendel s.t.
  10. 10.  Arsène Mersch s.t.

GC after Stage 19B:

  1. 1.      Sylvère Maes: 124hr 58min 2sec
  2. 2.      Félicien Vervaecke @ 27min 53sec
  3. 3.      Antonin Magne @ 29min 29sec

Stage 19C: Friday, July 31, Cholet – Angers, 67 km

  1. 1.      Paul Maye: 1hr 38min 30sec
  2. 2.      Sauveur Ducazeaux s.t.
  3. 3.      Mathias Clemens s.t.
  4. 4.      Raoul Lesueur s.t.
  5. 5.      Léo Amberg s.t.
  6. 6.      Jean-Marie Goasmat s.t.
  7. 7.      René Le Grevès @ 3min 53sec
  8. 8.      Eloi Meulenberg s.t.
  9. 9.      Aldo Bertocco s.t.
  10. 10.  Mariano Cañardo @ 4min 14sec

GC after Stage 19C

  1. 1.      Sylvère Maes: 126hr 40min 46sec
  2. 2.      Félicien Vervaecke @ 27min 53sec
  3. 3.      Antonin Magne @ 29min 29sec

Stage 20A: Saturday, August 1: Angers – Vire, 204 km

Places 7 – 41 given same time and place

  1. 1.      René Le Grevès: 7hr 38min 20sec
  2. 2.      Louis Thiétard s.t.
  3. 3.      Aldo Bertocco s.t.
  4. 4.      Sauveur Ducazeaux s.t.
  5. 5.      Sylvain Marcaillou s.t.
  6. 6.      François Neuville s.t.
  7. 7.      Sylvère Maes, Eloi Meulenberg, Marcel Kint, Cyriel Van Overberghe, etc. s.t.

GC after Stage 20A:

  1. 1.      Sylvère Maes: 134hr 19min 6sec
  2. 2.      Félicien Vervaecke @ 27min 53sec
  3. 3.      Antonin Magne @ 29min 29sec

Stage 20B: Saturday, August 1, Vire – Caen 55 km Team Time Trial

  1. 1.      Antonin Magne: 1hr 18min 16sec
  2. 2.      Pierre Cogan s.t.
  3. 3.      René Le Grevès s.t.
  4. 4.      Raoul Lesueur s.t.
  5. 5.      Robert Tanneveau s.t.
  6. 6.      Félicien Vervaecke @ 1min 4sec
  7. 7.      Marcel Kint s.t.
  8. 8.      Sylvère Maes s.t.
  9. 9.      Albert Hendrickx s.t.
  10. 10.  Théo Middeklkemp @ 2min 44sec

GC after Stage 20B:

  1. 1.      Sylvère Maes: 135hr 38min 26sec
  2. 2.      Antonin Magne @ 26min 55sec
  3. 3.      Félicien Vervaecke @ 27min 53sec

Stage 21 (final stage): Sunday, August 2, Caen – Paris, 235 km

  1. 1.      Arsène Mersch: 7hr 7min 50sec
  2. 2.      Pierre Clemens @ 32sec
  3. 3.      Mariano Cañardo @ 48sec
  4. 4.      Sylvain Marcaillou @ 1min
  5. 5.      Eloi Meulenberg @ 1min 16sec
  6. 6.      Raoul Lesueur s.t.
  7. 7.      Louis Thiétard s.t.
  8. 8.      Robert Tanneveau s.t.
  9. 9.      Pierre Cogan s.t.
  10. 10.  Antonin Magne s.t.
  11. 11.  Sylvère Maes s.t.
  12. 12.  Félicien Vervaecke s.t.

This excerpt is from the book “The Story of the Tour de France”, Volume 1 by Bill and Carol McGann. If you enjoy it we hope you will consider purchasing the book, either print or electronic. The Amazon link here will make either purchase easy.

TDF_front-cover-l

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