Tag Archive


 Tomorrow we ride…

He’s Not Heavy, He’s My Domestique

Contributed by Leslie Reissner

“Tomorrow we ride…” is a book of memoirs by Jean Bobet, a French intellectual who seems to have become a pro cyclist simply because of the force of his brother’s personality. That brother, of course, was Louison Bobet, the first cyclist to win the Tour de France three years in a row.

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 From Mother to Daughter

Happy Mother’s Day!

By: Spring in the Air

Letter from a Mother to a Daughter:
“My dear girl, the day you see I’m getting old, I ask you to please be patient, but most of all, try to understand what I’m going through.”

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 Growing up without a cell phone (OMG!)

Tales from the past

By: The Over 35 Crowd

If you are 35, or older, you might think this is hilarious!
When I was a kid, adults used to bore me to tears with their tedious diatribes about how hard things were. When they were growing up; what with walking twenty-five miles to school every morning…. Uphill… Barefoot… BOTH ways… yadda, yadda, yadda.

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 We are Awesome!!

About OUR generation

By: unknown

Read and remember!
No matter what our kids and the new generation think about us, WE ARE AWESOME !!! Our lives are living proof!

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 First Yellow Jersey

Retrospective

Source: Bike Race Info portal

Backpedalling through the archives – 1919 Tour Quick Facts:
5,560 km raced at an average speed of 24.056 km/hr, the slowest Tour ever.
67 starters and only 10 classified finishers. Eugène Christophe was leading the Tour until he broke his fork (again!) in the penultimate stage, which alone cost him 70 minutes. He then crashed again in the same stage and then suffered many flat tires in the final stage. In stage 10 Christophe is generally thought to have worn the Tour’s first yellow jersey.

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 First ever Tour de France

Retrospective

Source: Bike Race Info portal

Backpedalling through the archives – The Story of the 1903 Tour de France
110 years ago this July, the first ever Tour de France was raced. The Tour de France started as nothing more than a publicity stunt to sell some newspapers. At its heart, the Tour remains just that, a vehicle to sell tires, shoes, bikes, telephones and countless other items that the eager sponsors of the teams and the race want to promote.

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 Colnago Master

Retro cycling

From Italian Cycling Journal

If you could have only one bicycle…
What would it be? Most of us have a couple of different bicycles. So if you could only have only one, what type of bike would it be? I’m not sure what I’d choose, but I’ve been thinking about it lately, and that’s why I’m asking the question…

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 Pay phones

Retro

By: Zdenko Kahlina

Does anyone still use pay phones?
I honestly can’t remember the last time I used a pay phone, and I’m wondering if the time has come to send the existing ones to museums. Do any of you still use them? Does anyone use them?

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 Tour de France: The 80′s!

Retro Cycling

By Edmond Hood
 
Tour de France through the Decades:
Ed Hood moves us on into the 80s today with his Tour de France through the decades series. Let’s take a look back at the riders that defined the decade at the Tour de France and wonder for a moment: Who did shoot JR Ewing; Cliff Barnes? Nah! Kristin Shepard. Don’t worry if you had to Google that.

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 Tour de France: The 70′s!

Retro Cycling

By Edmond Hood

Tour de France through the Decades:
Sunday July 20th 1969; that’s 43 years ago now but I remember it clearly as the day that I first became aware of professional bicycle racing – I was 18 years-old. I walked in to the living room of our little flat in Kirkcaldy, Scotland and glanced at the black and white TV in the corner; the evening news had just begun and the picture was of a cycling track with the stands crammed to capacity.

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 Remembering Marco Pantani

Flashbacks from the peloton 

By: Zdenko Kahlina

Marco Pantani (January 13, 1970 – February 14, 2004)
It’s a decade since Marco Pantani, one of cycling’s most flamboyant characters was found dead in a Rimini hotel room. Tour de France and Giro d’Italia winner Marco Pantani was found dead on Saturday evening, February 14, 2004 on the floor of his Le Rose hotel room on Italy’s Adriatic coast, surrounded by half-empty jars of antidepressants. I can’t believe it’s been already ten years since that day.

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 The Kings of the Falling Leaves

Cycling Stories

Source: Fast Eddy’s Flandria Cafe

Rain, Oxygen and the Kings of Falling Leaves.
I’ve always had nostalgia for the Giro di Lombardia. So much, I even rode the now defunct Gazzetta Challenge Gran Fondo over there with Dr. Brad, back in 2008 – a 140k ride the day after we watched Damiano Cunego solo up San Fermo di Battaglia on his way to victory in the Classic itself.

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 Viktor Kapitonov, 1960 Olympic Champion

Retrospective

Sources: Fast Eddy’s blog, Top Dog Cycling

Viktor Kapitonov’s gold medal ride on a Cinelli bike!
Sporting legends… Who was yours when you were 12? When I got seriously hooked on cycling in 1978, one of the first cycling books I read was by one such legend, Viktor Kapitonov. At the time, he was the only Soviet rider ever to win an Olympic road race. The book was called “It’s worth living for” (Ради этого стоит жить). Almost 35 years later, looking at the title, I think I understand what he meant.

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 Gas Stations of the 1920’s

Retrospective

Source: Internet

USA Gas Stations in the early 1920’s
When Service Stations were Service Stations and did more then just pump gas And Car Dealers did more then Just Sell Cars.

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 1947 Tour de France

Retrospective

Source: Bike Race Info portal

Backpedalling through the archives – 1947 Tour Quick Facts:
4,640 km ridden at an average speed of 31.412 km/hr. Unlike the immediate pre-war Tours, the 1947 Tour had no half-stages. 100 starters aligned on national and regional teams with 53 classified finishers.

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 1936 Tour de France

Retrospective

Source: Bike Race Info portal

Backpedalling through the archives – 1936 Tour Quick Facts:
4,418 km raced at an average speed of 31.045 km/hr. 90 starters, 60 of whom are on national teams and 30 are touristes-routiers (independent riders). For complex political reasons, Italy did not send a team and a team of “Italians of France” was not allowed to start.

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 1924 Tour de France

Retrospective

Source: Bike Race Info portal

Backpedalling through the archives – 1924 Tour Quick Facts:
5,425 km raced at an average speed of 23.972 km/hr. 157 starters, 45 of whom were put in 1st class, 12 were 2nd class and 100 were independent touristes-routiers. There were 60 classified finishers.

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 1914 Tour de France

Retrospective

Source: Bike Race Info portal

Backpedalling through the archives – 1914 Tour Quick Facts:
5,405 km ridden at an average speed of 27.03 km/hr. 145 starters divided in “groupes”, that is, riders on sponsored teams and “isoles” or independent racers. 54 classified finishers. Philippe Thys took the lead in the first stage and held it to the end. Team Peugeot took 4 of the top 5 places.

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 Russian Nikolai Razouvaev

PEZ Talk

Source: PEZCycling News, By: Edmond Hood

Member of a red squad of the Soviet team from the 80′s
Back in the 70′s and 80′s the red squad of the Soviet teams dominated International amateur racing and were feared at every event they entered. But what was it really like behind the Iron Curtain competing for the USSR? Was the pressure really as high and the programme as tough as the rumors suggested? Ed Hood recently caught up with a man who lived through the programme and won races around the world as part of the red squad, Nikolai Razouvaev.

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 Fedor Den Hertog remembered

Retrospective

By Ed Hood

Remembering one of the great Dutch cyclists
Less than a month after the death of Peter Post, Dutch cycling has lost another of its ‘Greats’ with the news that Fedor Den Hertog succumbed on Saturday 12th February, 2011, after a long battle with illness. Ed Hood recalls his impressive career.

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 Marco Pantani Remembered

Cycling legends

Source: PEZ Cycling news, by Alessandro Federico

Nine Years After: Marco Pantani Remembered
14 February 2004. Marco Pantani dies alone in Rimini. In a motel, after three days spent in a small room without seeing anybody. Pantani was still a Pro rider. During the previous year, during the Giro, he was able to show great moments and I remember, all over the winter, many people wondering about Il Pirata’s plans for the 2004. Then it all ended.

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 Riding With Lance

Top rides

Source: PEZCycling News, by: Richard Pestes

My Ride With Lance: The Riplay
In 2005 I rode with Lance Armstrong & about 30 others on an exclusive cancer fundraiser over two days in Lake Louise Alberta. Lance was at the height of his powers and in spite of his rock-star approach to the people who’d bucked up $35K each for the experience, we were all awestruck by his presence.

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 Il Campionissimo

Cycling legends

Source: Italian Cycling Journal

A Talk with Felice Gimondi, “Il Campionissimo”
By Valeria Paoletti
Setting up an appointment with the great Felice Gimondi, Italy’s last Campionissimo (champion of champions), was not very easy. This very distinguished man was the last truly complete Italian rider capable of winning all the important races, which at that time required beating Eddy Merckx. Today he works for Bianchi and runs an insurance business. His work for Bianchi involves traveling not only all over Italy, but also out of his home country, such is his international prestige.

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 Eddy Merckx The Cannibal

Retro cycling

By: Daniel Friebe

Exclusive extract from Daniel Friebe’s book.
Forty-five years ago this week, in the spring of 1967, Eddy Merckx was already a two-time Milan-San Remo winner, already a flat-track bully of some repute, but also just one of several would-be kings of the cycling world.

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 The Rise and Fall of Marco Pantani

Flashback

Source: Pro Cycling magazine

The Rise and Fall of Marco Pantani: Pantani crashes in the 1995 Milano – Torino one-day race
Three years before he won the Tpour de France, Marco Pantani’s career hovered on the brink when he crashed into a Jeep during Milano – Torino on October 18, 1995.

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